A Microchip Restores Some Vision to Blind Patients

Comments: 0

Here is a piece of news that appearred in the MIT Technology Review, it is getting closer and closer for many of us to have replacement digital eyes! See below for a summary of the news and follow the link for the rest of the story.

A Microchip from Retina Implant Restores Some Vision to Blind Patients

A device that uses no externally visible gear enables patients to read letters and see faces.

By Susan Young on February 21, 2013
See here for Full Story

A wirelessly controlled microchip has restored limited vision to patients in a small experimental trial, report researchers in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

The German medical technology company Retina Implant developed the artificial retina, which was implanted in one eye of each participant as part of a company-funded trial. The patients had all been blinded by retinitis pigmentosa or another inherited disease that cause the eye’s light-detecting rod and cone cells, called photoreceptors, to degenerate and die over time. In theory, the device could also benefit patients with degenerative eye diseases such as macular degeneration, says Katarina Štigl, a clinical scientist and ophthalmologist at the University of Tübingen, who led the study.

With the implant, eight of the nine patients in the trial could perceive light. Five were able to detect moving patterns on a screen as well as everyday objects such as cutlery, doorknobs, and telephones. Three were able to read letters. Seeing their own hands and the faces of their loved ones had the biggest impression on the patients, says Štigl. “The very personal things, such as if a mouth is smiling, or the shape of a nose, are the most exciting for them,” she says.

The implanted device consists of a three-millimeter-square chip with 1,500 pixels.

more …

Comments

There are no comments. Make a Comment »

RSS feed for comments on this post.

Your Feedback

You must be logged in to post comments.